Discussion:
Helmet Camera for Trap
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Pavel Svinchnik
2017-01-21 22:02:43 UTC
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I was thinking of getting a helmet camera to help improve my trap shooting. If I recorded a few
outings, I might notice some re-occurring problems that I might be able to eliminate. Has anyone
tried this? If so, did it help?

Amazon has several helmet cams for under $100. One records at 60fps; that might be fast enough to
see where the pellets are going in slo-mo. Any recommendations re camera models or technical specs
to look for?

Paul
Synergy
2017-01-22 13:20:41 UTC
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On Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 4:02:44 PM UTC-6, Pavel Svinchnik wrote:
# I was thinking of getting a helmet camera to help improve my trap shooting. If I recorded a few
# outings, I might notice some re-occurring problems that I might be able to eliminate. Has anyone
# tried this? If so, did it help?
# Amazon has several helmet cams for under $100. One records at 60fps; thatmight be fast enough to
# see where the pellets are going in slo-mo. Any recommendations re camera models or technical specs
# to look for?
# Paul

That seems like a very good idea! But, of course, it leads me to think of other useful places to place the cams. The first that comes to mind are something a little more sophisticated than a GoPro/helmet cam. Placed to the left and right of the shooter and covering the areas the targets are expected to be in.


The one I would like to see is a target cam... Hmmm. Tricky..unless the rangemaster knows pretty much how the clays will fly and has several hardened cams in positions to track what is happening as the clays loft, roll, bounce, etc. (So sorry, I have never been into trap and skeet shootng much
, but absolutely loved Sporting Clays!)

But let us back off from things a bit. What we want to know is how the clays are flying and how well the pellets from the shotgun intersect that path at an opportune moment.

The clays could be RFID'd and the pellets from the shotshells, if not pure lead, might show up on a low power radar system. So coat the balls in the shotshell with something shiny to low-power radar and have each target RFID scanned eat least 10 times per second and you might learn something usef
ul.

The neat thing about your idea is that you don't have to use any exotic instrumentation, but rather just make sure it is enclosed in enough armor towithstand more than a few wild misses. I think RFID tags are becoming damned cheap, so the idea of embedding one in a shotgun pellet does not seem f
arfetched to me. WoW, I could be very wrong about that...

But hey, what do I know about Trap and Skeet shooting as I am trying hard to settle into Austin, TX and somehow make a living?

Regards,
Mark
Joe Pfeiffer
2017-01-23 10:09:06 UTC
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I question how much good a helmet cam would be for shotgun shooting --
it's so far from your eye, and that's so critical for shotgun, it
doesn't seem all that useful. Something on the underside of the barrel,
aligned with it, would tell me a lot about where I was actually pointing
when I fired (figuring out what I was doing wrong that kept me from
hitting the target would be another question....).
Peter Franks
2017-01-26 12:43:13 UTC
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On 1/21/2017 2:02 PM, Pavel Svinchnik wrote:
# I was thinking of getting a helmet camera to help improve my trap shooting. If I recorded a few
# outings, I might notice some re-occurring problems that I might be able to eliminate. Has anyone
# tried this? If so, did it help?
#
# Amazon has several helmet cams for under $100. One records at 60fps; that might be fast enough to
# see where the pellets are going in slo-mo. Any recommendations re camera models or technical specs
# to look for?

I've successfully used the following camera/mount, strapped to the
barrel/forend of the gun itself.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00METYIQ2

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00680WSVK

My camera only supports 30 FPS, but didn't find that to be a limiting
factor. Sure, slo-mo helps, but what I found more relevant was:

a) positioning of gun prior to shot
b) smoothness of mounting/aiming
c) actual aiming/point of aim given target movement, etc.
d) smoothness of pressing trigger/shot
e) follow thru

For me what I found was issues w/ actual aiming and follow-thru, of
which I subsequently addressed.

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