Discussion:
Machine gun question
(too old to reply)
b***@gmail.com
2016-11-13 10:49:37 UTC
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I've been reading about the Maxim Gun, but I haven't been able to learn much
about the cartridges that the early Maxim Guns used. I assume that they were
full metal jacket bullets, but since FMJs were invented only in 1882, and
the Maxim Gun was patented in 1883 and not demonstrated in public until 1884,
it's hard to see how it could have used FMJs. According to Wikipedia, FMJs
didn't become standard military rounds until 1886.

From what I have read about lead bullets, it doesn't seem possible that the
since it would foul badly after only a few shots, or so it seems. Which leads
me to assume that enough FMJs were available to Hiram Maxim to enable his
invention to work. I would appreciate any information or leads about this topic.

Bob Ingraham
Vancouver, BC
Just Wondering
2016-11-14 01:08:27 UTC
Permalink
On 11/13/2016 3:49 AM, ***@gmail.com wrote:
# I've been reading about the Maxim Gun, but I haven't been able to learn much
# about the cartridges that the early Maxim Guns used. I assume that they were
# full metal jacket bullets, but since FMJs were invented only in 1882, and
# the Maxim Gun was patented in 1883 and not demonstrated in public until 1884,
# it's hard to see how it could have used FMJs. According to Wikipedia, FMJs
# didn't become standard military rounds until 1886.
#
# From what I have read about lead bullets, it doesn't seem possible that the
# since it would foul badly after only a few shots, or so it seems. Which leads
# me to assume that enough FMJs were available to Hiram Maxim to enable his
# invention to work. I would appreciate any information or leads about this topic.

Using dogpile.com, my first search, "Maxim Gun" found this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxim_gun
The wikipedia article says the Maxim Gun was chambered for the .303
British cartridge, and has a link for that cartridge:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.303_British
The wikipedia article describes the projectile in considerable detail.
Steve W.
2016-11-14 12:16:22 UTC
Permalink
***@gmail.com wrote:
# I've been reading about the Maxim Gun, but I haven't been able to learn much
# about the cartridges that the early Maxim Guns used. I assume that they were
# full metal jacket bullets, but since FMJs were invented only in 1882, and
# the Maxim Gun was patented in 1883 and not demonstrated in public until 1884,
# it's hard to see how it could have used FMJs. According to Wikipedia, FMJs
# didn't become standard military rounds until 1886.
#
# From what I have read about lead bullets, it doesn't seem possible that the
# since it would foul badly after only a few shots, or so it seems. Which leads
# me to assume that enough FMJs were available to Hiram Maxim to enable his
# invention to work. I would appreciate any information or leads about this topic.

The earliest Maxims were using British Military standard lead bullet
.577/.450 black powder rounds. This round is a big (480 grain) slow
1,350 fps) bullet, with the water cooled barrel and the black powders
burn rate you don't get a lot of leading.


When the .303 was adopted the Maxim was changed over as well.
--
Steve W.
b***@gmail.com
2016-11-16 10:37:00 UTC
Permalink
On Monday, November 14, 2016 at 4:16:24 AM UTC-8, Steve wrote:

# The earliest Maxims were using British Military standard lead bullet=20
# .577/.450 black powder rounds. This round is a big (480 grain) slow=20
# 1,350 fps) bullet, with the water cooled barrel and the black powders=20
# burn rate you don't get a lot of leading.
#=20
# When the .303 was adopted the Maxim was changed over as well.
# Steve W.

That makes sense. Interesting. Thank you for your help.

I was wounded in Vietnam in 1966, shot through my right thigh, probably by an
M14. Only this year have I decided to write in depth about being shot and about
my recovery. It seemed necessary to provide information about ballistics, about
which I knew almost nothing (I was a Navy corpsman, not a Marine), and that led
me into the history of guns. Now I know a lot more; it's far more complex than
I ever dreamed.
Gunner Asch
2016-11-17 01:18:21 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Nov 2016 10:37:00 +0000 (UTC), ***@gmail.com
wrote:

#On Monday, November 14, 2016 at 4:16:24 AM UTC-8, Steve wrote:
#
## The earliest Maxims were using British Military standard lead bullet=20
## .577/.450 black powder rounds. This round is a big (480 grain) slow=20
## 1,350 fps) bullet, with the water cooled barrel and the black powders=20
## burn rate you don't get a lot of leading.
##=20
## When the .303 was adopted the Maxim was changed over as well.
## Steve W.
#
#That makes sense. Interesting. Thank you for your help.
#
# I was wounded in Vietnam in 1966, shot through my right thigh, probably by an
#M14. Only this year have I decided to write in depth about being shot and about
#my recovery. It seemed necessary to provide information about ballistics, about
#which I knew almost nothing (I was a Navy corpsman, not a Marine), and that led
#me into the history of guns. Now I know a lot more; it's far more complex than
#I ever dreamed.

Welcome to the Wonderful World of Ballistics (tm)

You will now probably enjoy these videos....

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrfKGpvbEQXcbe68dzXgJuA

Click on the link for "videos", get out a BIG bowl of popcorn and
watch history go by.

Thank you for your service.

Gunner,
RVN 71-73, 75th Rangers
TimR
2016-11-17 22:19:52 UTC
Permalink
Interesting site, thanks for that.

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